Sunday, August 20, 2006

Question . . . .

I posed a question to L-girl of "We Move to Canada", re: Do you know of any immigrant-applicants from the US that have been denied PR status in Canada? (Since Laura is the "Grande Dame" of the US-to-Canada immigrant community I thought she of all people would be aware of any instances of this situation.)

L-girl replied: "So far I have not heard of anyone who applied to emigrate to Canada who has not been accepted. I heard from a few people who were not accepted before the passmark was lowered. After that change, they applied again and got in."

Does anyone in the blogosphere have any stories of persons denied PR status? Please share if you do . . . . (I hope no one does, actually.)

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

No one that I know of.

That's a good thing, right?

L-girl said...

Whoo-hoo, I'm a Grande Dame! :-)

Thanks for the link. I'll be interested in seeing the responses to your question. I hope no one's heard of anyone.

Katrinka Bobinka said...

I do not personally know of anyone but would suggest you join this yahoo group and ask the question there.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/canadian_immigration/

I am betting you will get responses from a lovely and helpful group of people.

Tom said...

I don't know anyone personally, but at the below website some people seem to run into difficulties. Particularly with medicals.

http://www.immigration.ca/discussion/forum.asp?FORUM_ID=4

West End Bound said...

katrinka bobinka:

Thanks for the tip - I joined and tried to post the question although I don't see it . . . Who knows?

tom:

Yes, I've seen some of those reports, re: medicals. Hopefully that will not be an issue.

Idealistic Pragmatist said...

No, and I don't think it's likely that you'll find them. Why? Because the people who aren't going to make it *know* they're not going to make it as soon as they take the little online test and find that they don't have enough points. And then they don't apply. You can be kept out on the medicals, and theoretically if your security checks don't work out for some reason, but otherwise it's just a matter of paying the fees, jumping through the hoops, and waiting it out.

I totally understand the nervousness, though. I was nervous until I had the papers in my hot little hands, even though I'd already been *working* in Canada for a while by the time I got them!

As somewhat of a tangent, here's something I'm curious about: are you legally married to your partner (in Massachussetts, or Canada, or whatever)? If not, how is it that the two of you can apply together?

L-girl said...

As somewhat of a tangent, here's something I'm curious about: are you legally married to your partner (in Massachussetts, or Canada, or whatever)? If not, how is it that the two of you can apply together?

Hey, Allan and I aren't legally married either, and we also applied together.

Canada recognizes us - and West End Bound and drf, and Nick and Mason, and all families - as families. They call us common-law spouses, and make no distinction between same-sex and opposite-sex couples.

That was my favourite part of the application process. :)

Idealistic Pragmatist said...

Ah, of course, common law. I didn't realize that counted for immigration purposes, but am glad to hear it does. I was wondering how Canada would get around the fact that same-sex marriage isn't legal in most of the world; this certainly sounds like a good way of doing that.

West End Bound said...

"drf" and I, too, were able to apply as Common Law spouses as BC and Canada (currently anyway!) recognize same-sex relationships equally with opposite-sex ones. We had to document photos together, financial arrangements, wills, etc. to verify our relationship over the past 22 years. "drf" had a great time going down "Memory Lane" accumulating photos!

I agree, it is quite refreshing, isn't it?